Helping Those Who Protect: More Ways to Use Your Gannon Degree

Maj. Vincent B. Myers ’00, ’00C
Nursing

There is absolutely no better job than caring for America’s warriors (both current soldiers and retirees) and their families, and the leadership opportunities, cultural growth opportunities and the variety of clinical experience as an Army nurse are unmatched. So far, I have moved eight times in 11 years, all across the globe, and am currently stationed in Illesheim, Germany, where I am commander of the Illesheim Health Clinic. I have also served as: chief nurse executive at the Bamberg (Germany) Health Clinic; clinical head nurse at the 121st Combat Support Hospital in Seoul, South Korea; executive aide to the commanding general, Medical Research and Materiel Command, Ft. Detrick; and executive aide to the commanding general, Walter Reed Army Medical Center. I was deployed to Afghanistan in 2002 as a nurse for an area support medical company.

Elizabeth “Lisa” Hannold, Ph.D. ’86, ’96M
Counseling Psychology

When I talk to severely injured veterans, I hope they feel like they’ve found a friend; although not wounded in battle, I was born with a rare disease called spinal muscular atrophy. Studying in a research-based field had its struggles—lab accommodations for wheelchairs were often lacking, if available at all. It showed me the importance of enabling people with disabilities to establish realistic work goals. After graduation, I served as director of an independent living skills program at an apartment complex for people with disabilities, and I returned to Gannon to earn my master’s degree in community counseling while working full time. I relocated to Gainesville, Fla., in 1999 to earn a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science from the University of Florida.

Currently, I am a research health scientist and core investigator at the Veterans Affairs’ Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center there, and my research interests focus on the community reintegration of veterans with disabilities.

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